Home   •   message   •   submission   •   Archive   •   Theme
August 2014
28
Via   •   Source

Why your character’s religion (or lack of) is important:

petitelionwrites:

Anyone in the roleplay community who knows me knows i am one hundred percent about one specific thing: religions. It pains me to see people only use religion when they are playing “religion freaks”. That term roughly translates to someone who’s obsessed with religion and takes everything about a certain religion to heart. While these people do exist, it is more likely that you’ll see people who embrace only certain parts of a religion but religion does surround us on a day to day basis and if you want a realistic character or roleplay in general, you must take them into consideration. Stop being afraid of religions. 

RELIGION AND EDUCATION: 

  • If your roleplay is set in the United States of America then one of the first things that must come to mind is saying the pledge in the morning. “One nation, under God.” There are several ways people take the pledge: those who don’t pay much attention but say it anyway, those who say the pledge but emit the “God” part, and those who don’t say the pledge at all. Another thing you might want to consider is Catholic schools or any type of educational institution that takes religion into great consideration. It’s becoming rather tacky to see every single Catholic school girl hate religion in general, while yes, there is many Catholic school girls who hate their school simply because of how it is formatted, it doesn’t mean every single one of them is going to start hailing Satan. 
  • Another point, believing in Satan or some sort of underworld in general is a part of almost every single religion. While some may think of religions in general a simply a spiritual path towards heaven, hell is about 50% of religions. Why else would people be so intent on being good and getting into heaven? Because there’s the possibility of getting into hell. 
  • One last thing to consider regarding religions and education is the education of religions. You learn about religions in history class, in philosophy class, and in well, religion class if you attend a school/university that offers it. When talking about religion in a history class you only learn the basics because teachers aren’t allowed or have the time to go into depth with every single piece of a religion, religions are huge and complicated especially if you’re solely talking about the major ones (Islam, Christianity, Catholicism, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Judaism). In philosophy class you’re taught more in depth about religions but still not 100% and when you take a philosophy class or a history class you’re not necessarily taking either to learn about religions but to learn about every subject offered in the class. However, when you take a specific religious class it has to be because you’re interested in the religion or the religion is yours. 

RELIGION AND EATING: 

  • Buddhism: In Theravada and Mahayana schools many people do not eat meat or fish. Some are vegans and specifically in China and Vietnam, many do not eat onions or garlic. Buddha told people not to eat certain types of meats: humans, elephants, horses, dogs, snakes, lions, tigers, boars, and hyenas. This was due to self-respect and protection. Though there is no specific law in Buddhism regarding food, in the time of the Buddha himself, monks were expected to eat everything put in their begging bowl without discrimination. 
  • Hinduism: In this religion, meat, fish, poultry, and eggs are forbidden. People who follow this religion very closely also don’t eat garlic, onions, mushrooms, alcohol, and tea or coffee. In the Vedic texts, one should offer food as a sacrifice to God. Many references indicate that fruits, vegetables, grains, nuts, and dairy products are fit for humans to consume. The food offered to God is thought to bestow religious merit, purify the body, mind, and spirit. For this reason food has a close relation not only to the religion as a whole but in worship. The forbidden foods are considered ignorant and beef in particular is avoided due to respect for the cow. Bhishma, central character in a Hindu epic tells about how no sacrifice should be made without butter. Therefore, cows became essential. 
  • Christianity: Most Christians do not have a restriction when it come to eating meat though they refrain from eating it on Fridays or during Lent. There are only two biblical references regarding food: Genesis 9.1-4 and Genesis 1.29. The first allow people to eat meat under certain circumstances and the second states that vegetarianism was God’s original will. Most Christians will eat anywhere and don’t experience as many food restrictions as other religions. 
  • BROUGHT TO MY ATTENTION: hi! i saw your post about writing about religion and, while i didn’t read it thoroughly and just skimmed it, there was one thing that stuck out to me that i’d like to correct. i’m a christian (protestant) and in my experience, the refraining from eating meat on fridays and during lent is mainly a catholic tradition, not so much something that all christians do. just thought i’d point that out since it could be useful! — anonymous
  • Judaism: The ingredients forbidden in the Jewish religion are several: emulsifiers of animal origin, glycerin, gelatin, shellfish, and prawns. Kashrut is the system of Jewish dietary laws. The Torah does not specify any reason for dietary laws but they are followed in order to show obedience to God. Leviticus 11:3 states, “Whatsoever parteth the hoof, and is clovenfooted, and cheweth the cud, among the beasts, that shall ye eat.” 
  • Islam: Ingredients forbidden include pork, gelatin, meat not slaughtered in the prescribed way, blood, alcohol, carnivorous animals, and lard. Eating is a matter of faith, their dietary practices are also essentially about obeying God. You must recite the name of God (Allah) before eating and thank God after you are done. It is important to eat by the right hand in company and the name of Allah must be pronounced while slaughtering. It is also important to only eat when you are hungry and not to eat in excess. Essentially it is about thanking Allah for everything and keeping in mind that he is to thank for meals. 

RELIGION AND HOBBIES: 

CONCLUSION: 

  • Evidently, I don’t know everything about every religion and this was very generic and basic. If you’d like more information on a certain religion then please simply let me know. What I wanted to show more than anything, was that religion is such a part of everyday life. You see it in music, poems, television, movies, everywhere. It has even such a great part in dietary habits. It pains me the amount of people I see who are Buddhists and don’t take their dietary habits into consciousness or even their schools or prayers. I’m sorry that the world has decided to create this idea that religions are something to be feared, that they are evil, but they play a huge and essential part of every day life! Don’t play a religious freak, simply be conscious of what you are doing and saying. As always, if you would like to add more to this feel free, any questions contact me, any mistakes let me know. And have fun creating characters! 
August 2014
28
Via   •   Source

awsickdude asked

One of my main characters is Korean-American, but I'm afraid of white-washing his ancestry or making him into a stereotypical caricature. So I was wondering if you had any resources about Korean culture, writing characters outside of my race, etc?

fixyourwritinghabits:

image

I swear, like clockwork, we get this question nearly every month. What is the secret to writing something different from me? There are no secrets, there is no guides, no quick lists of what all Korean-Americans are like (because no one works that way). Don’t treat characters like they’re some unfathomable other, because they’re not, they’re human beings like you and me and anyone else.

Why are you worried about writing a stereotypical caricature? Is it because that’s all you know? Change that. Consume media written by Korean-Americans, realize that being Korean-American will effect who he is just like your background effects who you are, and make sure your characters are human beings.

Worried about white-washing history? Read history. There’s lots of it out there, by Korean-Americans, and it’s easily accessible on the internet. Go to museums, check out books assigned in Asian American studies. They exist, you’re just not looking for them.

Stop being afraid of writing POC characters because “you might get it wrong.” Do type the questions you just asked me into google, and start from there. Do realize that your characters are human, share the same interests and motivations as everyone else, and should be treated as such. .

#poc   #diversity   
August 2014
26
Via   •   Source
clevergirlhelps:

I see and write a lot of “DON’T DO THIS!!!” posts, so I thought I would make a “DO THIS!!!” post.
General Requests
More POC in leading roles
More important friendships
More queer characters in leading roles
More disabled characters in leading roles
More genderqueer and trans characters in leading roles
Realistic women in leading roles
Happier/more positive characters and messages
Specific
45 Things I Want to See More Of (Part 2)
Black Villains
Boys in YA
Characters
Cool Things (2) (3)
Fantasy (2)
Female Characters (2)
Female Character Traits
Happiness
Horror Genre Mashups
Magic Systems
Male Characters
Medieval Fantasy
Modern Fantasy
Plots
Relationships
Romance (2)
Soulmate AUs
Stories
Stories I Want to Read
Urban Fantasy
What thewritingcafe Wants
YA Novels (2) (3) (4)
My wish list tag is always updating and includes posts containing things I would like to see in fiction. characterandwritinghelp has a similar tag.
The plot bunnies tag is likewise updating and includes posts that I think would make for an interesting story.
More Things I Would Like to See
Steampunk with different ethnic influences alongside the gears
Utopias that try really hard to be good, even though they aren’t and never will be perfect
Science and magic coexisting
Creation stories - stories that focus on building and growth rather than destruction
People are good themes
Extroverted protagonists
Environments other than temperate deciduous
Stories centered on art
Stories without war
Read More

clevergirlhelps:

I see and write a lot of “DON’T DO THIS!!!” posts, so I thought I would make a “DO THIS!!!” post.

General Requests

  • More POC in leading roles
  • More important friendships
  • More queer characters in leading roles
  • More disabled characters in leading roles
  • More genderqueer and trans characters in leading roles
  • Realistic women in leading roles
  • Happier/more positive characters and messages

Specific

My wish list tag is always updating and includes posts containing things I would like to see in fiction. characterandwritinghelp has a similar tag.

The plot bunnies tag is likewise updating and includes posts that I think would make for an interesting story.

More Things I Would Like to See

  • Steampunk with different ethnic influences alongside the gears
  • Utopias that try really hard to be good, even though they aren’t and never will be perfect
  • Science and magic coexisting
  • Creation stories - stories that focus on building and growth rather than destruction
  • People are good themes
  • Extroverted protagonists
  • Environments other than temperate deciduous
  • Stories centered on art
  • Stories without war

Read More

#ideas   
August 2014
21
Via   •   Source

gingerrivers asked

Z, do you have any tips on writing pain? Not so much life threatening pain, but something long the lines of pulling a muscle or accidentally cutting your flesh? Please and thank you.

thetrolliestcritic:

You should check out my wounds tag

Here are some things on pulling muscles

As for accidental cuts, scratches, and things like that, the pain is usually minor but initial shock tends to exaggerate what you feel. Typically, you don’t have much to worry about these types of injuries other than perhaps infection, which can be avoided with putting rubbing alcohol or peroxide (peroxide usually does not sting/burn) onto the wound. Bleeding is usually minimal.

Here are some things on writing about pain

August 2014
18
Via   •   Source
heronswing:

Hey Crime Writers - don’t just have your detectives say bland things like “the fingerprints matched” - use correct terminology and make your writing precise. Here’s a cool little fingerprint chart to get you started.

heronswing:

Hey Crime Writers - don’t just have your detectives say bland things like “the fingerprints matched” - use correct terminology and make your writing precise. Here’s a cool little fingerprint chart to get you started.

#crime   #forensics   
August 2014
18
Via   •   Source

Major Writing Errors: How to Fix Them

mumblingsage:

thedancingwriter:

All writing advice is subjective, but there are some mistakes in writing that WILL ensure your novel’s failure, not only to your readers but to those who might be your potential agent or publisher. I’ve never really come across these mistakes when I used to review short stories for my literary magazine (I might have, I just don’t remember), but as a self-employed editor, I most certainly have come across them—and have made one or two myself.

  • Happy Beginnings. Many first chapters must start out with some sort of tension. In the first two books of The Stars Trilogy, they start out with heavy tension. Amelia from When Stars Die is terrified of the impending trials that will determine her readiness to be professed as a nun, and she is also seeing shadows no one else sees. That is when this book begins. In the sequel, Alice is slated to be executed for being a witch. In the most recent book I’m writing, the chapter starts out with my teen protagonist trying to get drunk: he is a recovering alcoholic, too. These are not happy beginnings. You don’t want your story to start out with your protagonist having a perfect life. Something that essentially upsets your character must occur.
  • Fearless Story. Something needs to threaten the character throughout the book, whether this is the threat of death, the threat of psychologically coming undone, the threat of losing things the character love, and so on and so forth. A story without fear is not a story at all. Throughout When Stars Die, Amelia’s primary threat is the threat of death: her death and her younger brother’s death. Think about your favorite books and what threatened the characters in these books the most.
  • Loaded Dialogue. In real life dialogue is loaded, but readers want to read a more concise version of that dialogue. I didn’t have too many issues with loaded dialogue in When Stars Die, but I did in its sequel. Let me give you a few examples of loaded dialogue, and then how to fix that dialogue.

“Gene, can’t you stop drinking just for one freaking night?”

“No, Josh. You just don’t understand me. You don’t understand what this does for me.’

“I might not understand, but I do know this isn’t the best way to deal with your problems.”

“Then obviously you’ve never had problems before.”

“Obviously you can’t handle your own problems!”

Here is a more concise version:

Josh glares at the shot glass. “Shit. Just stop already.”

“Give me a reason.”

“Do you really need one?”

I look beyond Josh, swirling the vodka. ”Your life’s perfect.”

Josh digs his nails into the palms of his hands, the knuckles whitening. “Screw you, Gene. Screw you.”

  • Predictability. Sometimes there are some very astute readers who can already tell what is going to happen. For example, I am an astute reader. I already knew who the culprit was in Cheryl Rainfield’s Stained, but that didn’t make the book any less enjoyable. I also had one reader who adored When Stars Die, even though some of the twists were not twists for her; however, many other readers of mine did not see the twists coming. These twists keep your book from being predictable. Knowing what’s coming can kill the tension.

If you’re struggling with making something unexpected happen, come up with a list of outcomes that could occur in certain situations. Concentrate on description, dialogue, and action. Write what could occur with your description. With Amelia’s character, she often describes things rather negatively because of her surroundings, so when she comes across something positive, the surprise lies in the negative she is still going to find. You can create a twist using your dialogue to shock the other character. Refer to my dialogue example above. Josh is put off by Gene’s ambivalent attitude about his drinking problem. As for action, there needs to be unexpected outcomes that occur. For example, in When Stars Die, you think Amelia is supposed to kill a certain antagonist, but she’s not the one who does it.

  • Ambivalence. You love the book when you draft; however, when you begin to revise it, you hold a certain amount of ambivalence toward it. You already wrote the book, so you lose your excitement because you think nothing new can happen. But a lot of new things can happen. Delve deeper into your characters. Flesh them out. Find better ways to tell your story. Look at all characters, including your antagonists, and see how you can make them better. Look at sub-plots and find ways to make them stronger. Revisions are essentially about cutting the fat, about making the book much better than its draft, about trying to make the second draft different from the first. I love the process of revisions, because I already know what revising a draft means.

Message me with any questions or comments. Next post will be on writing a novel without an outline, which is crazy, because I can’t do this. This post will be for those who absolutely do not want to outline, even if they are stuck on their stories.

Ohh, “Loaded Dialogue” is a thing I’ve had issues with (in my writing & in what I read) for years without having a term for it. Thanks! 

August 2014
17
Via   •   Source
winterbcky:

writing: suspense ;; an instrumental mix

perihelion - trent reznor & atticus ross // descent - austin wintory // oxymorons - alexandre desplat // rain - marco beltrami // use and abuse part 1 - andrew hale // obelisk - timber timbre // legions (war) - zoe keating // in chaos eternal - atrium carceri // great bird of prey - trent reznor & atticus ross // the void - steven price // the tale of the three brothers - alexandre desplat // constellations - balmorhea // i’m goblin - hans zimmer and the magnificent six // interrogation - the chemical brothers

winterbcky:

writing: suspense ;; an instrumental mix

perihelion - trent reznor & atticus ross // descent - austin wintory // oxymorons - alexandre desplat // rain - marco beltrami // use and abuse part 1 - andrew hale // obelisk - timber timbre // legions (war) - zoe keating // in chaos eternal - atrium carceri // great bird of prey - trent reznor & atticus ross // the void - steven price // the tale of the three brothers - alexandre desplat // constellations - balmorhea // i’m goblin - hans zimmer and the magnificent six // interrogation - the chemical brothers

#music   #suspense   #inspiration   
August 2014
16
Via   •   Source

Anonymous asked

Google isn't helping but I really need some reference on whip fighting. As searching for whips usually lead to fetishs and such. Wording my research correctly is almost impossible.

milkovichhelps:

Whip fighting, you say?

image

Sorry, I couldn’t help it.

First off, I’m so sorry if you’ve been waiting for an answer for a while, tumblr never notified me I had a message >< Anyway, I can definitely see where you’d be hitting a block with this topic. I tried to do a little research myself and the majority of what I found tended to lead me down a BDSM path. If none of the resources I was able to find helped you out I’d try asking howtofightwrite, they focus solely on the combat and weapons side of writing so they’ll probably have more info on this topic than me. 

Articles and Online Guides

Videos

My advice when researching this topic, is to pick out the type of whip your character is using then google that name along with the words “fighting” or “combat”, what useful links I did find were all through googling “bullwhip fighting” or “bullwhip combat”.

- Mickey

 

#fight scene   #whips   #whip   
August 2014
15
Via   •   Source
rpchew:



Guide on: Taiwan 


Being half Taiwanese, I’ve decided to give this guide a go. This is just a few pointers if you’re playing someone who is from Taiwan or the Republic of China or if we’re doing anything international, Chinese Taipei. This is split into different sections so just read what you want. I highly encourage you to research past this. 


Updated as of 6th Jul 2014 with a word count of 1252.
Read More

rpchew:

Guide on: Taiwan 
Being half Taiwanese, I’ve decided to give this guide a go. This is just a few pointers if you’re playing someone who is from Taiwan or the Republic of China or if we’re doing anything international, Chinese Taipei. This is split into different sections so just read what you want. I highly encourage you to research past this.
Updated as of 6th Jul 2014 with a word count of 1252.

Read More

#taiwan   #locations